Have You Seen The Med List Lately?


The beauty of hindsight is that I can look back at my time caring for JHP,JR and start to see the forest and the trees. One issue we faced a couple times involved one little piece of paper. It’s one of those things many families might overlook just because they haven’t thought about it or because they assume staff handles it. Sadly, this extremely important piece of paperwork is not always managed as well as it should be.

When living in any kind of residential facility, your loved one will probably be sent to the nearest emergency room in the event of serious illness or injury. When the paramedics arrive, the nursing staff will hand off a patient information packet to be taken to the emergency room. Contained in this stack of papers is the current medications list. Sounds simple, right? Well….

Almost every time JHP, JR ended up in the hospital, I found myself standing next to a seasoned nurse trying to decipher the list of his medications. Unfortunately, and nearly tragically, his list was never an easy read. When there were notations, they were often vague. We couldn’t always tell which medications he was still taking. The nurses and I had to rely on what was written on the facility’s list or call my sister to find out. Even if you remember all but one medication, it can be problematic. For example, the hospital gave my father blood pressure medication because it was still listed. It took JHP,JR’s blood pressure to nearly bottoming out before they realized he didn’t need it. And guess what? He had either been taken off the med or it was reduced significantly, but his med list did not reflect this information accurately.

It’s as simple as that. Even if you know most of the medications by heart, miss one and it can be life-threatening.

I can’t stress enough how very important it is to have a current and legible list of medications. And when I say ‘legible,’ I mean easy for a layperson to read. If you aren’t able to put your hands on the meds list at the facility (which would be a red flag to me), then make sure you, or the person who will be there for your loved one, is informed about the medications and dosages your loved one takes, and why he/she takes them. Then, keep that information current in your own records. There has to be a well-maintained master list that anybody and everybody can understand.

As soon as you can, visit to the nurses’ station at your loved one’s residence to see his/her current med list.  Check it and recheck it. Then, clarify the information and confirm it. Check it monthly if you can. And check it again. If the staff doesn’t allow you to see the information, go to the supervisor, then to an administrator. It’s in everybody’s best interest the list is legible, current, and easy to understand. Consider keeping your own copy of the list so that you don’t have to rely on staff. Just do whatever you need to do to make sure you have access to a current list of medications and the dosages. I hope you never find out how scary it is to see what can happen when the wrong medications are given.

Lucy
Jerome’s Daughter

 

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